What are the Most Awkward Rhymes in Modern Music History?

March 21, 2018

DreamsTime

Today we’re celebrating World Poetry Day. Sure, we could celebrate by writing something profound or by sharing the works of great poets like Shakespeare or Robert Frost.... but, alas, we aren't going to do either. We wanted to take a different route.

We’re celebrating by looking at some of the worst poetry, if you can even call it that, in modern music history. Now, we’re not faulting the artists or the songwriters here. Sometimes you’re in a creative pinch and need to get the song done, we get that. But these are some of our favorite affronts to the English language.

“Summer Girls” by LFO
This song would probably make Shakespeare cringe. Which, of course, is kind of ironic since the lyrics actually reference Shakespeare. 

The worst lyric that we found is this one:
When you take a sip you buzz like a hornet
Billy Shakespeare wrote a whole bunch of sonnets

What does Shakespeare have to do with the “girls who are stopping by the summer?”  By the way, do these guys actually know Shakespeare well enough to call him Billy? I'm pretty sure my high school English teacher would not have been thrilled if I said "Billy wrote Romeo and Juliet." 



“Bills, Bills, Bills” by Destiny’s Child
We totally jammed out to this song as much as you probably did in 1999. In fact, we'll totally excuse Destiny’s Child for this because it was their first single. But did the girls really just keeping making up new ways to rhyme the word "bills" with "bills?" 

The lyrics:
Can you pay my bills?
Can you pay my telephone bills?
Can you pay my automo-bills?



“Hotel Room Service” by Pitbull
We’re also huge fans of Pitbull, and his songs are super catchy. Trust us, we totally understand that.

However, the lyrics in this track follow what one website calls “a nursery rhyme structure.”

Here they are: 
We at the hotel, motel, Holiday Inn
We at the hotel, motel, Holiday Inn



You know what, though? All of these songs are so catchy that we don’t really care about their imperfect rhymes.